Oceans Like Us W.I.P.

Accretions
Whalewaste
Mare Liberum

 

Toxic Progeny

Breakdown and discussion on Heather Davis’ article Toxic Progeny.

… the whole world can be plasticized, and even life itself.
–Roland Barthes, Mythologies

A cod swallowed a dildo. What did it birth? Is it done birthing? Did it die from that encounter?

On Blue and Sea Colors

Some excerpts from Brain Pickings’ 200 Years of Blue.

Rebecca Solnit, A Field Guide to Getting Lost:

The world is blue at its edges and in its depths. This blue is the light that got lost. Light at the blue end of the spectrum does not travel the whole distance from the sun to us. It disperses among the molecules of the air, it scatters in water. Water is colorless, shallow water appears to be the color of whatever lies underneath it, but deep water is full of this scattered light, the purer the water the deeper the blue. The sky is blue for the same reason, but the blue at the horizon, the blue of land that seems to be dissolving into the sky, is a deeper, dreamier, melancholy blue, the blue at the farthest reaches of the places where you see for miles, the blue of distance. This light that does not touch us, does not travel the whole distance, the light that gets lost, gives us the beauty of the world, so much of which is in the color blue.

For many years, I have been moved by the blue at the far edge of what can be seen, that color of horizons, of remote mountain ranges, of anything far away. The color of that distance is the color of an emotion, the color of solitude and of desire, the color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go. For the blue is not in the place those miles away at the horizon, but in the atmospheric distance between you and the mountains. “Longing,” says the poet Robert Hass, “because desire is full of endless distances.” Blue is the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world.

We treat desire as a problem to be solved, address what desire is for and focus on that something and how to acquire it rather than on the nature and the sensation of desire, though often it is the distance between us and the object of desire that fills the space in between with the blue of longing. I wonder sometimes whether with a slight adjustment of perspective it could be cherished as a sensation on its own terms, since it is as inherent to the human condition as blue is to distance? If you can look across the distance without wanting to close it up, if you can own your longing in the same way that you own the beauty of that blue that can never be possessed? For something of this longing will, like the blue of distance, only be relocated, not assuaged, by acquisition and arrival, just as the mountains cease to be blue when you arrive among them and the blue instead tints the next beyond. Somewhere in this is the mystery of why tragedies are more beautiful than comedies and why we take a huge pleasure in the sadness of certain songs and stories. Something is always far away.

Also from Brain Pickings:

Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us:

To the human senses, the most obvious patterning of the surface waters is indicated by color. The deep blue water of the open sea far from land is the color of emptiness and barrenness; the green water of the coastal areas, with all its varying hues, is the color of life. The sea is blue because the sunlight is reflected back to our eyes from the water molecules or from very minute particles suspended in the sea. In the journey of the light rays into deep water all the red rays and most of the yellow rays of the spectrum have been absorbed, so when the light returns to our eyes it is chiefly the cool blue rays that we see. Where the water is rich in plankton, it loses the glassy transparency that permits this deep penetration of the light rays. The yellow and brown and green hues of the coastal waters are derived from the minute algae and other microorganisms so abundant there. Seasonal abundance of certain forms containing reddish or brown pigments may cause the “red water” known from ancient times in many parts of the world, and so common is this condition in some enclosed seas that they owe their names to it — the Red Sea and the Vermilion Sea are examples.

The unrelieved darkness of the deep waters has produced weird and incredible modifications of the abyssal fauna. It is a blackness so divorced from the world of the sunlight that probably only the few men who have seen it with their own eyes can visualize it. We know that light fades out rapidly with descent below the surface. The red rays are gone at the end of the first 200 or 300 feet, and with them all the orange and yellow warmth of the sun. Then the greens fade out, and at 1000 feet only a deep, dark, brilliant blue is left. In very clear waters the violet rays of the spectrum may penetrate another thousand feet. Beyond this is only the blackness of the deep sea.

 

 

Discard Studies

This compendium and rubric are of interest to working on waste and oceans:

 

Jellyfish/food futures reading list

Spineless, Juli Berwald
book

“Jellyfish Blooms: advances and challenges”
link
As jellyfish interactions with humans increase in coastal waters, there is an urgent need to provide science-based management strategies to mitigate the negative socioeconomic impacts of jellyfish blooms and to exploit potential benefits of their ecosystem services. This Theme Section presents the latest advances in jellyfish research, from new sampling methods to food-web and life-cycle studies. The methodological advances presented will help to overcome difficulties in sampling due to the fluctuations in abundance and irregular distributions of jellyfish.

“Eating Jellyfish: safety, chemical and sensory properties”
link
People’s preference for fish with a high trophic level, like Atlantic cod and tuna, leads to a large food footprint. Responsible seafood consumption should include underutilised local products; hence the culinary use of edible jellyfish can be an effective contribution. The present work focused on Catostylus tagi to contribute to the consumption of edible jellyfish in the West.

FOOD FUTURES

Agriculture, Climate Change and Food Security in the 21st Century: Our Daily Bread, Lewis H. Ziska
link
This book explores the history of agriculture, and the threat that climate change imposes for all aspects of our “daily bread”. While these challenges are severe and significant, it argues that we are not without hope, and offers a wide range of solutions, from polyculture farming to feminism that can, when applied, lead to a better future for humankind.

“Moving from ‘‘matters of fact’’ to ‘‘matters of concern’’ in order to grow economic food futures in the Anthropocene,” Ann Hill
link
Agrifood scholars commonly adopt ‘‘a matter of fact way of speaking’’ to talk about the extent of neoliberal rollout in the food sector and the viability of ‘‘alternatives’’ to capitalist food initiatives. Over the past few decades this matter of fact stance has resulted in heated debate in agrifood scholarship on two distinct battlegrounds namely, the corporate food regime and the alternative food regime. In this paper I identify some of the limitations of speaking in a matter of fact way and of focusing on capitalist and neoliberal economies as the yardstick by which to assess all food economy initiatives. Using stories of bananas in Australia and the Philippines I advocate for a new mode of critical inquiry in food scholarship that focuses on matters of concern. Following Bruno Latour I use the term critical inquiry to refer to research methods and thinking practices that multiply possible ways of being and acting in the world. The new mode of critical inquiry I propose centers on enacting three broad research matters of concern. These are (1) gathering and assembling economic diversity (2) human actancy and (3) nonhuman actancy. I argue that through becoming critical minds in the Latourian sense researchers can play a key role in enacting economic food futures in the Anthropocene.

“Future of Food: How We Cook,” Nicola David et al
link
Rustling up a meal becomes a whole new experience when you can print your own food, use a smart oven or have a robot do all the work for you

IFTF: Food Futures Lab

In 2017, the Food Futures Lab will conduct a deep dive into the motivations, aspirations, and strategies of eaters as they adapt to this emerging world and look to food as a lever for transformation. To gain insight into this future, we will map the strategies that eaters around the world are using to ensure they are eating safe, nutritious, sustainable, and delicious food.

 

University of Sheffield Sustainable Food Futures

Based at the University of Sheffield, we are an interdisciplinary initiative that seeks to research and deliver sustainable agri-food systems in order to provide sufficient safe, affordable and nutritious food for all.

Home

The world is increasingly urban. W hat urban dwellers eat now and will eat i n the future, and how this food is brought to them, will impact the sustainability of our food systems. We therefore need to work on urban food systems – i.e.

Oceans Like Us – references

Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP) | Census of Marine Life

No Description

 

Dossier: The Ocean Atlas | Heinrich Böll Foundation

The ocean covers more than two-thirds of our planet’s surface. It is rich in resources and provides us with food, energy, and minerals. Oceans are important transportation routes and crucial for the stability of our climate and the weather. But due to overfishing, the loss of biodiversity, and ocean pollution, the future of this unique ecosystem faces a grave threat today.

Ocean wilderness ‘disappearing’ globally

Scientists have mapped marine “wilderness” areas around the world for the first time. These are regions minimally impacted by human activities such as fishing, pollution and shipping. The team, led by researchers in Australia, found that just 13.2% of the world’s oceans could be classed as wilderness – most in international waters, away from human populations.